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Wellbeing resources for schools

We provide a wide variety of resources that are available to download FREE. Our resources are designed to support your use of BounceTogether and help you refine your whole school approach to mental health and wellbeing.

Children's Reading Choices Report

If we want to motivate young readers, then knowing what they like to read and enabling them to choose is essential. Choice and agency in reading matter. This fantastic report, produced by The Open University, draws on data from The Attitude to Reading Survey, undertaken by 1194 children aged 8-11 years as part of their schools’ engagement with BounceTogether. Findings highlight the importance of creating time to explore and discover new books as a reader.

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Bounce Forward - 5 ways to wellbeing ideas

Bounce Forward have published some ideas around how to improve your wellbeing by building on the "5 ways to wellbeing" concept, developed by the New Economics Foundation. Download them for some FREE, original ideas.

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10 Ideas to Create a Happy Classroom (Poster)

Brought to your by Adrian Bethune at Teachappy.co.uk, here is a free poster summarising the 10 key ideas from the award-winning book Wellbeing In The Primary Classroom. Print it off for your classroom to remind you of what really matters!

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18 Wellbeing Hacks for Students

Brought to you by www.wellbeinghacks.org, here is a great poster for secondary students with some simple wellbeing tips and 'hacks'. Perfect for promoting in your student common rooms or wellbeing displays!

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5 ways to wellbeing postcards

The concept of the "five ways to wellbeing", produced by the New Economics Foundation, is a great way of demonstrating some small things you can do to improve your wellbeing. Further, we've created these 5 'postcards' as a way you can promote them in your school/organisation!

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Wellbeing Posters For Schools

Our carefully designed wellbeing posters provide essential support and encouragement for students of all ages. Each poster is crafted to address key areas of mental and emotional health, promoting a positive and supportive school environment.

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School Wellbeing Calendar - Summer Term 2024

This comprehensive calendar is designed to support your school in promoting wellbeing and mental health awareness. It provides information on important awareness days and suggests surveys to capture relevant insights from pupils, staff, and parents during the Summer Term.

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ANTS vs PETS Lesson Plan

This FREE lesson plan has been created to help pupils understand what automatic thoughts are and how influence our behaviour, identify these, and use their skills to turn them into positive thoughts.

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Bounce Together Frequently Asked Questions

We believe it’s crucial to measure the wellbeing of pupils, staff, and parents. While we routinely measure academic outcomes, there is currently no mandatory requirement for schools to measure wellbeing. BounceTogether has been designed to help schools collect data around mental health and wellbeing so they can work to drive improvements in behaviour, attendance, engagement, overall achievement, and more.

This document aims to address common questions, providing clarity on the purpose and process of wellbeing measurement.

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School Wellbeing Calendar - Spring Term 2024

This comprehensive calendar is designed to support your school in promoting wellbeing and mental health awareness. It provides information on important awareness days and suggests surveys to capture relevant insights from pupils, staff, and parents during the Spring Term.

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The Children's Wellbeing Snapshot 2023

This report draws insight from 40,037 anonymised responses to The Stirling Children’s Wellbeing Scale (SCWBS), taken on the BounceTogether platform during the 2022 to 2023 academic year.

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Surveys for Senior Mental Health Leads

This resource is designed to support Senior Mental Health Leads with the measurement aspect of their training by highlighting key pupil, staff, and parent surveys that can be used to benchmark and track wellbeing across the school community

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BounceTogether Brochure

Whether you are already measuring wellbeing in school or looking to get started, we are confident our platform can make a difference! Find out why hundreds of like-minded schools are choosing to work with BounceTogether by downloading our brochure.

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Ofsted Pupil, Staff, and Parent Voice

Why should your school join thousands of others regularly running the Ofsted surveys with pupils, staff, and parents?

Whether you are expecting an inspection or not, these surveys can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school.

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Preparing for Ofsted - Guidance for schools around Ofsted and PSHE

This document provides information to support primary schools, secondary schools, and colleges in preparing for an Ofsted inspection into SEMH provision.

  • The new Ofsted framework
  • What to expect?
  • What is a deep dive?
  • What questions are being asked?
  • What evidence can be used to support you during an inspection?
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Annotated Staff Wellbeing Report

This sample report presents one school's findings after running The Work-related Quality of Life Scale in a presentation-ready format that explains how the questions are scored.

The document allows you to see the level of insight provided at the touch of a button by the BounceTogether platform and is a valuable resource if you need to produce wellbeing reports for your school Governors or SLT.

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A school's guide to building a wellbeing measurement strategy

This practical guide provides information to support primary schools, secondary schools, and colleges in implementing an effective wellbeing measurement strategy.

  • What is wellbeing?
  • Why measure wellbeing?
  • Building an effective wellbeing measurement strategy
  • Capturing data
  • Results and analysis
  • Comparing results
  • Sharing insights

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Autumn Term Wellbeing Timeline

This document outlines our 4-step guidance to help you run effective benchmarking surveys over the Autumn Term. The timeline also suggests some of our recommended surveys for different age groups.

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School Wellbeing Calendar - Autumn 2023

This comprehensive calendar is designed to support your school in promoting wellbeing and mental health awareness. It provides information on important awareness days and suggests surveys to capture relevant insights from pupils, staff, and parents.

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BounceTogether Action Plan
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Healthy Minds Timeline

The following document outlines how you can work with the Healthy Minds Resilience Skills Lessons Survey and supplementary BounceTogether surveys to evaluate progress for all pupils and monitor the impact of Healthy Minds lessons over the course of the academic year

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Annotated Pupil Wellbeing Report

This sample report presents one school's findings after running The Stirling Children's Wellbeing Scale in a presentation-ready format that explains how the questions are scored.

The document allows you to see the level of insight provided at the touch of a button by the BounceTogether platform and is a valuable resource if you need to produce wellbeing reports for your school Governors or SLT.  

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12 ways BounceTogether can support your school

Find out how our digital platform can support your school's wellbeing strategy with our 12 simple steps and practical advice.

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Supporting the 8 principles of a whole school approach to mental health and wellbeing

This document contains guidance to help you understand how BounceTogether can support your school in achieving the learning outcomes aligned to the 8 principles of a whole school approach to mental health and wellbeing.

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Survey Summary

Guidance on the 60+ validated, age-appropriate surveys on the BounceTogether platform. Easily navigate our digital surveys across 12 categories by key stage, area, and package

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5 Ways to Wellbeing Posters

The concept of the "five ways to wellbeing", produced by the New Economics Foundation, is a great way of demonstrating some small things you can do to improve your wellbeing. We've created a set of posters for Primary and Secondary schools to help you promote each of the "5 ways" in your school/organisation! Don't forget to check out our postcards too.

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View our surveys by Key Stage

Questionnaire Name
Description

KINDL is a psychometrically acceptable method of measuring quality of life in children. The KINDL consists of six dimensions; Physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem, family, friends and everyday functioning. This questionnaire was developed with the aim of producing a set of flexible questions which could be answered by children of varying age groups; with this particular version targeting children in key stage 1.

Applies to KS1

The results from the "attitude to reading" survey for primary schools can be invaluable in helping you to drive and encourage autonomous, positive reading engagement across your whole school, where reading for pleasure is embedded into everyday school life. This survey helps you to learn about a pupil's attitude towards reading and can help you understand what your pupils are really thinking and feeling.

Created in partnership with the School Library Association and the National Literacy Trust, this survey captures information about reading habits, perceptions and attitudes; ultimately enabling you to create a measure of a pupil's reading engagement and enjoyment levels. Here are some of the many ways the results of this survey can be used:

  • Insight into reading, helping you form the basis of a whole-school reading strategy
  • Information to help guide "book stock" choices for your school
  • Identify and help pupils that are in need of extra support but maybe don't want to say
  • Results to help you measure the impact and progress of reading interventions
Applies to KS1

The Ofsted pupil questionnaire is great way to get the views and opinions of your pupils about all aspects of school life. This questionnaire is useful way of obtaining an overall picture of how things are going in school as well as highlighting any areas that may have been missed. Note that Ofsted usually supply an online version of the questionnaire for completion during an inspection. However, many schools like to run this survey to gather the views of their staff and pupils, even outside of an inspection window.

This survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Applies to KS1

The PSS-C is helpful for the early identification of children at risk of anxiety/stress. This is important because stress appears to result in increased vulnerability for poorer school outcomes and reduced home functional performance, as well as resulting in problems with overall health, mental health and body weight. An effective and efficient assessment for early identification of anxiety/stress in children assists in the development of appropriate interventions.

Applies to KS1

The development of a healthy eating style and physical fitness regimen in adolescence or adulthood might be contingent on physical self-concept in childhood. This scale assesses Global physical self-concept and subscales of Physical Performance, Physical Appearance, and Weight Control behaviours in children 6 to 11 years of age.

Applies to KS1

The CYRM has been designed as a screening tool to explore the resources (individual, relational, communal and cultural) available to individuals that may bolster their resilience. The measure was designed as part of the International Resilience Project (IRP), of the Resilience Research Centre, in collaboration with 14 communities in 11 countries around the world. This survey should be assigned if the 'Student Resilience Survey' is deemed inappropriate to allocate to your intended year/class.

Applies to KS1
Questionnaire Name
Description

This exclusive survey has been produced in partnership with online safety specialists Online Safety UK to help schools understand and monitor the online experiences of pupils. The survey measures pupils’ online behaviours and provides teachers with a picture of whether pupils are equipped with the skills they need to navigate their online activities safely. Here are some examples of the things you might do with the results:

  • Pupil-led assembly. Pupils present survey findings in a school assembly, promoting open dialogue and understanding among students, parents, and teachers about online experiences and safety
  • Curriculum enhancement. Use survey insights to enrich the curriculum with targeted lessons on online safety, fostering a proactive approach to responsible online behaviour practices
  • Parent-teacher meetings. Share survey results with teachers to create customised support plans for students, organise workshops for parents based on the findings
Applies to KS2

The Growth Mindset Survey is designed to help you understand your pupils’ thoughts aout learning and intelligence, whether they have a fixed or growth mindset, and whether they believe abilities can be developed through effort and learning. This survey, tailored for schools, aims to collect valuable insights directly from pupils. By exploring their beliefs and attitudes, teachers can gain a deeper understanding of how pupils approach challenges, view their own abilities, and navigate the learning process.

Applies to KS2

The Learning Emotions Math Survey can help schools find out how students feel about math. It asks about specific emotions like relief, shame, enjoyment, anxiety, pride, boredom, hope, and disappointment. By understanding these feelings, teachers can get insights into how students experience math. This helps them teach in ways that support students better, identify areas where students might need more help, and create a positive and enjoyable learning environment for math.

The survey is split into two separate surveys with 24 questions in each.

Applies to KS2

This survey aims to find out more about the reading parents/carers do with their children.

Applies to KS2

Research has shown how various types of student subjective well-being are related to positive educational outcomes. Student subjective well-being has been shown to correlate positively with achievement (particularly in primary school students) and feeling accepted and fitting in at school (particularly in secondary school students).

The SSWQ is a 16-item measure for assessing subjective wellbeing of pupils in the school environment. It includes 4 key areas of school life and wellbeing looking deeper into school connectedness and belonging, academic efficacy, joy of learning and educational purpose. School connectedness is linked to levels of anxiety and Emotionally Based School Avoidance (EBSA)

  • School connectedness is defined as feeling cared for by and relating well to others at school;
  • Academic efficacy is defined as appraising one’s academic behaviours as effectively meeting environmental demands;
  • Joy of learning is defined as experiencing positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in academic tasks;
  • Educational purpose is defined as appraising school and academic tasks as important and meaningful.

Subscale scores can be used as standalone wellbeing indicators or summed to create a Overall Student Wellbeing composite scale.

Applies to KS2

Kidscape and Bounce Together have designed 3 short surveys based on the theme of kindness, to help you measure experiences of kindness within the school community. This survey is for pupils/learners.

Applies to KS2

Given the increased testing of school-aged children, there is a need for a current and valid scale to measure the effects of test anxiety in children. Individuals are involved in three different processes to express test anxiety including their cognition (i.e., worry), behaviour (i.e., task-relevant and task irrelevant actions), and physiology (i.e., emotional arousal). In association with these factors, this survey looks at test anxiety for primary school children in the context of their (1) thoughts; (2) Nervous system reactions; and (3) Off-task behaviours.

Applies to KS2

The scale consists of six subscales aimed at assessing specific types of anxiety: Social Phobia (SP), Panic disorder (PD), agoraphobia (AP), Generalised Anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), Separation anxiety disorder (SAD), and specific phobias (PFI[fear of physical injury]).

Subscales are scored separately to produce scores pertinent to the specific sub-construct, and also added together for an overall anxiety symptoms score. Since its creation, the scale has become a standard questionnaire and its psychometrics have been tested thoroughly in a multitude of studies across several countries.

Applies to KS2

This questionnaire is designed to help you find out more about how and what your pupils read, their views towards reading and how they feel about going to a new school. It aims to give you insight into the reading behaviour of your pupils, which will help you discover how best to support them now and in the future when they start the next phase of their education.

  • Get to know your new pupils
  • Learn more about the reading behaviours and feelings towards reading of your new students
  • Help you effectively plan and tailor your library inductions
  • Support you in planning where to spend your budget
Applies to KS2

The Child Relationship Survey has been developed by the #2 world-leading researcher in the impacts of bullying behaviour, Professor Dieter Wolke. Bullying is a prevalent issue in educational settings on a global scale, with current data identifying that 1 in 3 children report incidences of bullying (World Health Organisation).

This survey not only explores the child’s relationships with their peers but also goes a step further to develop an understanding of the impact of sibling relationships on a child's developmental behaviours. More recently the survey has incorporated the pressing issue of cyberbullying and the negative impact upon victims, highlighting the accessibility that young people have to this media.

The survey drills down to identify the types of bullying that occur within a setting and the number of instances, allowing the formulation of action plans and specific interventions, again adopting a positive proactive approach to dealing with bullying.

Applies to KS2

Sport England run an Active Lives Children and Young People Survey (covering years 1-11), which is published annually and gives a comprehensive view of how people are getting active

This survey covers the key themes included in the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey for levels of activity (during the school day and outside school) and types of activity. This survey can then be used in conjunction with other surveys from the (1) Physical Activity and Behaviours category e.g.Attitudes to Physical Activity; Time spent not being active; School travel mode and parental physical activity practices; Sleeping habits; (2) Perceptions of Self category e.g. Physical Self Perception Profile; and (3) Mental wellbeing category, to draw some key associations and linkages between physical activity and wellbeing

Applies to KS2

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. However it is important to understand how many hours a day, including weekends, children spend time being inactive and what are they spending time on being inactive e.g. Using a phone or texting ; Using a games console or other video game device.

Applies to KS2

Self-efficacy is an individuals' confidence in their ability to successfully perform a particular task. Self-efficacy beliefs therefore play a role in maintenance of health behaviours over time. This survey aims to assess self-efficacy beliefs related to physical activity engagement.

The survey includes important questions such as:

  • "I think I can be physically active no matter how busy my day is."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if my friends want me to do something else."
  • "I think I can ask my parent/guardian to get me the equipment I need to be physically active."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if I could watch TV or play video games instead."

By exploring these aspects of self-efficacy, we can better understand how to support and empower students in adopting and maintaining active lifestyles despite potential barriers.

Applies to KS2

Food behaviours, attitudes, environments and knowledge are relevant for childhood obesity prevention, as are dietary patterns which promote positive energy balance.

Loughborough University have developed a questionnaire booklet (using previously used/validated questionnaires) for an intervention study on screen-time and diet.

There are 17 questions from this booklet in this survey covering the dietary behaviours of children.

Applies to KS2

A key focus in school and relationship education, should be on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with particular reference to friendships, family relationships, and relationships with other children and with adults.

This survey looks at the engagement of parents in setting discipline and structure in their child's life e.g. My parents set rules for what I can use the computer/tablet for; My parents set rules for the type of sweet/savoury (e.g. crisps, biscuits) snacks I can have

Applies to KS2

A key focus in school and relationship education, should be on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with particular reference to friendships, family relationships, and relationships with other children and with adults.

This survey captures a child's feedback on their relationship with their parent/step-parents/carer they have the closest relationship with through a series of scenario's.

For example, Selected parent/step-parents/carer...gives lots of care and attention to me; ...is easy to talk to; ...makes me feel better after I discuss my worries with him/her

Applies to KS2

It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on access to devices, social media and websites, but what pupils enjoy doing whilst online and their attitudes and behaviour whilst online.

Applies to KS2

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. Schools also provide a unique context for learning when receptiveness and capacity for attitudinal and behavioural modification is probably at its greatest. It is not surprising, therefore, that various attempts have been made in the past to promote children’s health and fitness through the school curriculum

However it is important to understand an activity profile that includes transport to school and parents who provided either more role modelling or logistic support for Physical Activity may also be more likely to facilitate active travel as part of the overall supportive approach to Physical Activity within the household. This survey focuses on school travel mode and parenting practices and modelling of behaviour

Applies to KS2

The relationship between physical activity, obesity, and overall wellbeing is well-established. However, assessing physical activity goes beyond simply meeting guidelines. Physical activity encompasses a variety of behaviors in different settings with diverse purposes and intentions.

To gain a comprehensive understanding, it's important to explore attitudes and motives towards sport and physical activity. These factors play a crucial role in a child's resilience and overall wellbeing.

This survey delves into key attitudes and motives related to participation in sport and physical activity. By understanding these aspects, we can better support and promote active lifestyles among students.

Applies to KS2

Sleep is an important contributor to physical and mental health. However, chronic sleep deprivation has become common in adolescents, especially on weekdays. Indeed there has been a decline of 0.75 min/night/year in sleep duration over the last 100 years, with the greatest rate of decline in sleep occurring for adolescents and on school days.

Furthermore, insufficient sleep as a possible cause of weight gain and obesity has received considerable attention in the media and scientific literature over the past decade - as lack of sleep impacts on eating and activity behaviours. This survey covers some key questions compiled by Loughborough University, who have engaged in a body of research looking at the interconnections between sleep, sedentary behaviour, physical activity and diet

Applies to KS2

Adaptability is defined as appropriate cognitive, behavioural, and/or affective adjustment in the face of uncertainty and novelty. Adaptability has a role in predicting academic (motivation, engagement, disengagement) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, emotional instability) outcomes.

Furthermore, adaptability significantly predicts academic (class participation, school enjoyment, and positive academic intentions—positively; self-handicapping and disengagement—negatively) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and sense of meaning and purpose—positively) outcomes beyond the effects of socio-demographic factors and prior achievement.

The Adaptability Scale comprises nine items, each item reflecting the following criteria: (a) appropriate cognitive, behavioural, or affective adjustment in response to (b) uncertainty and/or novelty that has (c) a purpose or outcome

Applies to KS2

Social-emotional development is increasingly viewed as a central part of schooling in order to help students develop skills that can assist them in navigating the challenges of life.

Part of this social-emotional development involves students being able to effectively navigate adversity and setback, including that which occurs within the academic domain.

Buoyancy refers to an appraisal of one's capacity to deal with a setback Academic buoyancy relates to all students because of the ever-present low-level challenges of everyday academic life.

Applies to KS2

Social physique anxiety is social psychological variable derived from theories of self presentation and impression management that reflects an individual’s perceived worry or concern with the presentation of the physique in situations in which others are perceived to be evaluating them (Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989; Leary & Kowalski, 1990). Social physique anxiety is important because it has been shown to be related to salient psychological and behavioural factors associated with health.

For example, social physique anxiety is associated with physical self-esteem (Kowalski, Crocker, & Kowalski, 2001), body image (Chad & Spink, 1996), dissatisfaction with appearance and weight (Crawford & Eklund, 1994), eating attitudes (Haase & Prapavessis, 1998) and motivation to avoid of health-related behaviours, such as physical activity. Overall, females are at higher risk to develop social physique anxiety disorders

Applies to KS2

The Children’s Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) is a modified version of the Eating Attitudes Test. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder.

The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges. Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process.

According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder.

Applies to KS2

Self-esteem is an individual's subjective evaluation of their own worth. Self-esteem encompasses beliefs about oneself (for example, "I am unloved", "I am worthy") as well as emotional states, such as triumph, despair, pride, and shame. Many researchers use the term state self esteem to refer to the emotions we are feeling at a point in time, and trait self-esteem to refer to the way people generally feel about themselves.

The State Self Esteem Scale (SSES) a 20-item scale that measures a participant’s self-esteem at a given point in time, and can therefore be measured on a regular basis, recognising the notion that self-esteem is open to momentary changes.

Applies to KS2

The results from the "attitude to reading" survey for primary schools can be invaluable in helping you to drive and encourage autonomous, positive reading engagement across your whole school, where reading for pleasure is embedded into everyday school life. This survey helps you to learn about a pupil's attitude towards reading and can help you understand what your pupils are really thinking and feeling.

Created in partnership with the School Library Association and the National Literacy Trust, this survey captures information about reading habits, perceptions and attitudes; ultimately enabling you to create a measure of a pupil's reading engagement and enjoyment levels. Here are some of the many ways the results of this survey can be used:

  • Insight into reading, helping you form the basis of a whole-school reading strategy
  • Information to help guide "book stock" choices for your school
  • Identify and help pupils that are in need of extra support but maybe don't want to say
  • Results to help you measure the impact and progress of reading interventions
Applies to KS2

The Ofsted pupil questionnaire is great way to get the views and opinions of your pupils about all aspects of school life. This questionnaire is useful way of obtaining an overall picture of how things are going in school as well as highlighting any areas that may have been missed. Note that Ofsted usually supply an online version of the questionnaire for completion during an inspection. However, many schools like to run this survey to gather the views of their staff and pupils, even outside of an inspection window.

This survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Applies to KS2

The PSS-C is helpful for the early identification of children at risk of anxiety/stress. This is important because stress appears to result in increased vulnerability for poorer school outcomes and reduced home functional performance, as well as resulting in problems with overall health, mental health and body weight. An effective and efficient assessment for early identification of anxiety/stress in children assists in the development of appropriate interventions.

Applies to KS2

The development of a healthy eating style and physical fitness regimen in adolescence or adulthood might be contingent on physical self-concept in childhood. This scale assesses Global physical self-concept and subscales of Physical Performance, Physical Appearance, and Weight Control behaviours in children 6 to 11 years of age.

Applies to KS2

The CYRM has been designed as a screening tool to explore the resources (individual, relational, communal and cultural) available to individuals that may bolster their resilience. The measure was designed as part of the International Resilience Project (IRP), of the Resilience Research Centre, in collaboration with 14 communities in 11 countries around the world. This survey should be assigned if the 'Student Resilience Survey' is deemed inappropriate to allocate to your intended year/class.

Applies to KS2

Research indicates that children as young as 7-8 years old are able reporters of their own mental health. In community setting (particularly schools), self-report measurement supports screening for problems and early intervention. The measure consists of 16 items; 10 of which comprise the emotional difficulties subscale and 6 the behavioural difficulties subscale.

Applies to KS2

KINDL is a psychometrically acceptable method of measuring quality of life in children. The KINDL consists of six dimensions; Physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem, family, friends and everyday functioning. This questionnaire was developed with the aim of producing a set of flexible questions which could be answered by children of varying age groups; with this particular version targeting children between the ages of 7 and 13 (there are also versions for other age groups). It was developed in order to remedy the discrepancy between the urgency of the issue quality of life of adolescents and the lack of solutions available.

Applies to KS2

This scale is extensively used in cross-cultural studies in up to 53 different nations. It is a 10-item scale that measures global self-worth by measuring both positive and negative feelings about the self. Low self-esteem is significantly related to depression, suicide ideation, victimisation, delinquency, eating disorders and low happiness. This survey is therefore a highly valued indicator of a student's mental health; allowing staff to identify and, as a result, direct help to any student who registers as having low self-esteem.

Applies to KS2

This survey is a global self-report measure of life satisfaction. It measures a pupil's life satisfaction in five key domains (family, friends, school, self and living environment), with the aim of promoting positive psychological wellbeing. The design enables this survey to be used across a range of ages and ability levels; not only providing an illustration of satisfaction within five specific areas, but also giving a clear overview of more general life satisfaction.

Applies to KS2

Based on the Trait Emotional Intelligence Theory, the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire is a significant part of research in emotional intelligence (EI). This questionnaire measures Emotional Intelligence (mixed and trait), Perceptions of Self, Social and Emotional Competence.

Applies to KS2

The Stirling Children's Wellbeing Scale is a questionnaire designed to measure emotional and psychological wellbeing in children aged 8 to 15 years and is ideal for measuring wellbeing in a primary and secondary school. The survey consists of 15 positively worded questions that aim to provide a holistic view of children's wellbeing.

The questions cover a range of topics, including positive emotions, relationships with others, and sense of purpose. The results of the survey can provide valuable insights into the emotional and psychological wellbeing of students, and can inform the development of interventions or programs to promote student wellbeing.

Unique to the BounceTogether platform, schools can compare their own results to a large sample giving them more perspective compared to what you will find anywhere else. It's a highly regarded survey, that's trusted by hundreds of school on the BounceTogether platform.

Applies to KS2
Questionnaire Name
Description

Social-emotional development is increasingly viewed as a central part of schooling in order to help students develop skills that can assist them in navigating the challenges of life.

Part of this social-emotional development involves students being able to effectively navigate adversity and setback, including that which occurs within the academic domain.

Buoyancy refers to an appraisal of one's capacity to deal with a setback Academic buoyancy relates to all students because of the ever-present low-level challenges of everyday academic life.

Applies to KS3

The results from the "attitude to reading" survey for primary schools can be invaluable in helping you to drive and encourage autonomous, positive reading engagement across your whole school, where reading for pleasure is embedded into everyday school life. This survey helps you to learn about a pupil's attitude towards reading and can help you understand what your pupils are really thinking and feeling.

Created in partnership with the School Library Association and the National Literacy Trust, this survey captures information about reading habits, perceptions and attitudes; ultimately enabling you to create a measure of a pupil's reading engagement and enjoyment levels. Here are some of the many ways the results of this survey can be used:

  • Insight into reading, helping you form the basis of a whole-school reading strategy
  • Information to help guide "book stock" choices for your school
  • Identify and help pupils that are in need of extra support but maybe don't want to say
  • Results to help you measure the impact and progress of reading interventions

Applies to KS3

The relationship between physical activity, obesity, and overall wellbeing is well-established. However, assessing physical activity goes beyond simply meeting guidelines. Physical activity encompasses a variety of behaviors in different settings with diverse purposes and intentions.

To gain a comprehensive understanding, it's important to explore attitudes and motives towards sport and physical activity. These factors play a crucial role in a child's resilience and overall wellbeing.

This survey delves into key attitudes and motives related to participation in sport and physical activity. By understanding these aspects, we can better support and promote active lifestyles among students.

Applies to KS3

In recent years, researchers have estimated that concerns about body appearance do not only affect females but males as well. The latest research has estimated that the number of boys engaging in weight loss strategies range from 21.5 to 50%: one-third of adolescent boys prefers a thinner body size, and another one-third prefers a larger and more muscular body (Choane & Pope, 2001; Furnhman & Calnan, 1998; McCabe & Ricciardelli, 2001, 2003, 2004).

Moreover, McCabe and Ricciardelli (2005a) indicated that already at the age of eight, boys focus on increasing the size of their muscles and are already receiving messages to achieve this goal. Gender differences are clear: boys focus on the muscular apparatus, while girls focus on weight loss and body image and appearance.

The Body Esteem Scale focuses on 3 areas - (1) Appearance: the general feeling about appearance; (2) Weight: weight satisfaction; (3) Attribution: the evaluation attributed to others about one’s own body and appearance

Applies to KS3

30-items to assess an individual’s tendency to engage in social comparison in domains related to the body, eating, and exercise.

Applies to KS3

The Child Relationship Survey has been developed by the #2 world-leading researcher in the impacts of bullying behaviour, Professor Dieter Wolke. Bullying is a prevalent issue in educational settings on a global scale, with current data identifying that 1 in 3 children report incidences of bullying (World Health Organisation).

This survey not only explores the child’s relationships with their peers but also goes a step further to develop an understanding of the impact of sibling relationships on a child's developmental behaviours. More recently the survey has incorporated the pressing issue of cyberbullying and the negative impact upon victims, highlighting the accessibility that young people have to this media.

The survey drills down to identify the types of bullying that occur within a setting and the number of instances, allowing the formulation of action plans and specific interventions, again adopting a positive proactive approach to dealing with bullying.

Applies to KS3

It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on access to devices, social media and websites, but what pupils enjoy doing whilst online and their attitudes and behaviour whilst online.

Applies to KS3

It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on the time and types of social media usage, but their attitudes and behaviour whilst online.

Applies to KS3

The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder. The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges.

Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process. According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder

Applies to KS3

Food behaviours, attitudes, environments and knowledge are relevant for childhood obesity prevention, as are dietary patterns which promote positive energy balance.

Loughborough University have developed a questionnaire booklet (using previously used/validated questionnaires) for an intervention study on screen-time and diet.

There are 17 questions from this booklet in this survey covering the dietary behaviours of children.

Applies to KS3

Taking the key themes of the health module of the Millenium Cohort Study, known as 'Child of the New Century', this survey looks at eating and drinking behaviours of young children.

The Millennium Cohort Study has provided important evidence to show how circumstances in the early stages of life can influence later health and development.

Applies to KS3

KINDL is a psychometrically acceptable method of measuring quality of life in children. The KINDL consists of six dimensions; Physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem, family, friends and everyday functioning. This questionnaire was developed with the aim of producing a set of flexible questions which could be answered by children of varying age groups; with this particular version targeting children between the ages of 7 and 13 (there are also versions for other age groups). It was developed in order to remedy the discrepancy between the urgency of the issue quality of life of adolescents and the lack of solutions available.

Applies to KS3

KINDL is a psychometrically acceptable method of measuring quality of life in children. The KINDL consists of six dimensions; Physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem, family, friends and everyday functioning. This questionnaire was developed with the aim of producing a set of flexible questions which could be answered by children of varying age groups; with this particular version targeting young people in adolescence.

Applies to KS3

Kidscape and Bounce Together have designed 3 short surveys based on the theme of kindness, to help you measure experiences of kindness within the school community. This survey is for pupils/learners.

Applies to KS3

The Learning Emotions Math Survey can help schools find out how students feel about math. It asks about specific emotions like relief, shame, enjoyment, anxiety, pride, boredom, hope, and disappointment. By understanding these feelings, teachers can get insights into how students experience math. This helps them teach in ways that support students better, identify areas where students might need more help, and create a positive and enjoyable learning environment for math.

The survey is split into two separate surveys with 24 questions in each.

Applies to KS3

Research indicates that children as young as 7-8 years old are able reporters of their own mental health. In community setting (particularly schools), self-report measurement supports screening for problems and early intervention. The measure consists of 16 items; 10 of which comprise the emotional difficulties subscale and 6 the behavioural difficulties subscale.

Applies to KS3

The Multidimensional Test Anxiety Scale (MTAS) was developed as instrument for measuring test, or examination anxiety (henceforth referred to as test anxiety), in populations of secondary school students aged 11 to 19 years. The 16 items correspond to two cognitive subscales and two affective-physiological subscales.

The MTAS consists of 16 items that ask how students generally feel before, during, or after, tests or examinations. These items are intended to measure relatively stable individual differences in the tendency for students to appraise tests and examinations as a threat and become anxious. A highly test anxious student will show a greater tendency to appraise tests and test-like situations (those situations where one’s performance will be assessed in some way) as threatening and respond with greater anxiety.

The two cognitive subscales are Worry over Failure and Perceived Cognitive Interference (i.e. one’s perception of how anxiety interferes with the cognitive processes required in tests such as memory and concentration). The two affective-physiological subscales are Feelings of Tension and Perceived Physiological Indicators of Anxiety.

Applies to KS3

This survey is a global self-report measure of life satisfaction. It measures a pupil's life satisfaction in five key domains (family, friends, school, self and living environment), with the aim of promoting positive psychological wellbeing. The design enables this survey to be used across a range of ages and ability levels; not only providing an illustration of satisfaction within five specific areas, but also giving a clear overview of more general life satisfaction.

Applies to KS3

The Ofsted pupil questionnaire is great way to get the views and opinions of your pupils about all aspects of school life. This questionnaire is useful way of obtaining an overall picture of how things are going in school as well as highlighting any areas that may have been missed. Note that Ofsted usually supply an online version of the questionnaire for completion during an inspection. However, many schools like to run this survey to gather the views of their staff and pupils, even outside of an inspection window.

This survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Applies to KS3

This exclusive survey has been produced in partnership with online safety specialists Online Safety UK to help schools understand and monitor the online experiences of pupils. The survey measures pupils’ online behaviours and provides teachers with a picture of whether pupils are equipped with the skills they need to navigate their online activities safely. Here are some examples of the things you might do with the results:

  • Pupil-led assembly. Pupils present survey findings in a school assembly, promoting open dialogue and understanding among students, parents, and teachers about online experiences and safety
  • Curriculum enhancement. Use survey insights to enrich the curriculum with targeted lessons on online safety, fostering a proactive approach to responsible online behaviour practices
  • Parent-teacher meetings. Share survey results with teachers to create customised support plans for students, organise workshops for parents based on the findings
Applies to KS3

A key focus in school and relationship education, should be on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with particular reference to friendships, family relationships, and relationships with other children and with adults.

This survey captures a child's feedback on their relationship with their parent/step-parents/carer they have the closest relationship with through a series of scenario's.

For example, Selected parent/step-parents/carer...gives lots of care and attention to me; ...is easy to talk to; ...makes me feel better after I discuss my worries with him/her

Applies to KS3

Self-efficacy is an individuals' confidence in their ability to successfully perform a particular task. Self-efficacy beliefs therefore play a role in maintenance of health behaviours over time. This survey aims to assess self-efficacy beliefs related to physical activity engagement.

The survey includes important questions such as:

  • "I think I can be physically active no matter how busy my day is."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if my friends want me to do something else."
  • "I think I can ask my parent/guardian to get me the equipment I need to be physically active."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if I could watch TV or play video games instead."

By exploring these aspects of self-efficacy, we can better understand how to support and empower students in adopting and maintaining active lifestyles despite potential barriers.

Applies to KS3

Physical self-concept is considered to be an important psychological outcome, and factors associated with the self regulation of physical activity such as attitudes and intention Importantly, physical self-concept is viewed as an important contributor to perceptions of self-worth in multidimensional, hierarchical models of self-esteem.

The physical self is defined as an individual’s perception of himself or herself in aspects of physical domains such as strength, endurance, sport ability, and physical appearance.

Applies to KS3

This survey aims to find out more about the reading parents/carers do with their children.

Applies to KS3

This scale is extensively used in cross-cultural studies in up to 53 different nations. It is a 10-item scale that measures global self-worth by measuring both positive and negative feelings about the self. Low self-esteem is significantly related to depression, suicide ideation, victimisation, delinquency, eating disorders and low happiness. This survey is therefore a highly valued indicator of a student's mental health; allowing staff to identify and, as a result, direct help to any student who registers as having low self-esteem.

Applies to KS3

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. Schools also provide a unique context for learning when receptiveness and capacity for attitudinal and behavioural modification is probably at its greatest. It is not surprising, therefore, that various attempts have been made in the past to promote children’s health and fitness through the school curriculum

However it is important to understand an activity profile that includes transport to school and parents who provided either more role modelling or logistic support for Physical Activity may also be more likely to facilitate active travel as part of the overall supportive approach to Physical Activity within the household. This survey focuses on school travel mode and parenting practices and modelling of behaviour

Applies to KS3

Sleep is an important contributor to physical and mental health. However, chronic sleep deprivation has become common in adolescents, especially on weekdays. Indeed there has been a decline of 0.75 min/night/year in sleep duration over the last 100 years, with the greatest rate of decline in sleep occurring for adolescents and on school days.

Furthermore, insufficient sleep as a possible cause of weight gain and obesity has received considerable attention in the media and scientific literature over the past decade - as lack of sleep impacts on eating and activity behaviours. This survey covers some key questions compiled by Loughborough University, who have engaged in a body of research looking at the interconnections between sleep, sedentary behaviour, physical activity and diet

Applies to KS3

Social physique anxiety is social psychological variable derived from theories of self presentation and impression management that reflects an individual’s perceived worry or concern with the presentation of the physique in situations in which others are perceived to be evaluating them (Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989; Leary & Kowalski, 1990). Social physique anxiety is important because it has been shown to be related to salient psychological and behavioural factors associated with health.

For example, social physique anxiety is associated with physical self-esteem (Kowalski, Crocker, & Kowalski, 2001), body image (Chad & Spink, 1996), dissatisfaction with appearance and weight (Crawford & Eklund, 1994), eating attitudes (Haase & Prapavessis, 1998) and motivation to avoid of health-related behaviours, such as physical activity. Overall, females are at higher risk to develop social physique anxiety disorders

Applies to KS3

The Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) is one of the most commonly used self-report measures of endorsement of Western appearance ideals. This 30-item self-report measure provided four subscales: Information (nine items; e.g., “TV programs are an important source of information about fashion and being attractive”), Pressures (seven items; e.g., “I’ve felt pressure from TV or magazines to lose weight”), Internalization—General (nine items; e.g., “I compare my body to the bodies of TV and movie stars”), and Internalization—Athlete (five items; e.g., “I try to look like sports athletes”). The SATAQ-3 has been used in many populations including adolescents, college students, and community samples.

Applies to KS3

The scale consists of six subscales aimed at assessing specific types of anxiety: Social Phobia (SP), Panic disorder (PD), agoraphobia (AP), Generalised Anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), Separation anxiety disorder (SAD), and specific phobias (PFI[fear of physical injury]).

Subscales are scored separately to produce scores pertinent to the specific sub-construct, and also added together for an overall anxiety symptoms score. Since its creation, the scale has become a standard questionnaire and its psychometrics have been tested thoroughly in a multitude of studies across several countries.

Applies to KS3

Self-esteem is an individual's subjective evaluation of their own worth. Self-esteem encompasses beliefs about oneself (for example, "I am unloved", "I am worthy") as well as emotional states, such as triumph, despair, pride, and shame. Many researchers use the term state self esteem to refer to the emotions we are feeling at a point in time, and trait self-esteem to refer to the way people generally feel about themselves.

The State Self Esteem Scale (SSES) a 20-item scale that measures a participant’s self-esteem at a given point in time, and can therefore be measured on a regular basis, recognising the notion that self-esteem is open to momentary changes.

Applies to KS3

The Stirling Children's Wellbeing Scale is a questionnaire designed to measure emotional and psychological wellbeing in children aged 8 to 15 years and is ideal for measuring wellbeing in a primary and secondary school. The survey consists of 15 positively worded questions that aim to provide a holistic view of children's wellbeing.

The questions cover a range of topics, including positive emotions, relationships with others, and sense of purpose. The results of the survey can provide valuable insights into the emotional and psychological wellbeing of students, and can inform the development of interventions or programs to promote student wellbeing.

Unique to the BounceTogether platform, schools can compare their own results to a large sample giving them more perspective compared to what you will find anywhere else. It's a highly regarded survey, that's trusted by hundreds of school on the BounceTogether platform.

Applies to KS3

Research has shown how various types of student subjective well-being are related to positive educational outcomes. Student subjective well-being has been shown to correlate positively with achievement (particularly in primary school students) and feeling accepted and fitting in at school (particularly in secondary school students).

The SSWQ is a 16-item measure for assessing subjective wellbeing of pupils in the school environment. It includes 4 key areas of school life and wellbeing looking deeper into school connectedness and belonging, academic efficacy, joy of learning and educational purpose. School connectedness is linked to levels of anxiety and Emotionally Based School Avoidance (EBSA)

  • School connectedness is defined as feeling cared for by and relating well to others at school;
  • Academic efficacy is defined as appraising one’s academic behaviours as effectively meeting environmental demands;
  • Joy of learning is defined as experiencing positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in academic tasks;
  • Educational purpose is defined as appraising school and academic tasks as important and meaningful.

Subscale scores can be used as standalone wellbeing indicators or summed to create a Overall Student Wellbeing composite scale.

Applies to KS3

Adaptability is defined as appropriate cognitive, behavioural, and/or affective adjustment in the face of uncertainty and novelty. Adaptability has a role in predicting academic (motivation, engagement, disengagement) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, emotional instability) outcomes.

Furthermore, adaptability significantly predicts academic (class participation, school enjoyment, and positive academic intentions—positively; self-handicapping and disengagement—negatively) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and sense of meaning and purpose—positively) outcomes beyond the effects of socio-demographic factors and prior achievement.

The Adaptability Scale comprises nine items, each item reflecting the following criteria: (a) appropriate cognitive, behavioural, or affective adjustment in response to (b) uncertainty and/or novelty that has (c) a purpose or outcome

Applies to KS3

The Children’s Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) is a modified version of the Eating Attitudes Test. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder.

The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges. Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process.

According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder.

Applies to KS3

Emotion dysregulation often emerges early in development and is a core feature of many psychological conditions. The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) is a well validated and widely used self-report measure for assessing emotion regulation problems among adolescents and adults. The DERS has six subscales with five to eight items each (36 total).

A substantial body of research has shown significant positive associations between scores on the DERS (specifically the total score) and symptoms of a range of psychological disorders, including borderline personality disorder (Gratz et al., 2006), generalized anxiety disorder (Mennin et al., 2002), substance use disorders (Fox et al., 2007; Gratz and Tull, 2010), social anxiety (Rusch et al., 2012), health anxiety (Bardeen and Fergus, 2014), post-traumatic stress disorder (Ehring and Quack, 2010), and bipolar disorder (Becerra et al., 2013; Van Rheenen et al., 2015).

The DERS short form (DERS-SF) instrument maintains the excellent psychometric properties and retains the total and subscale scores of the original measure with half the items.

Applies to KS3

The General Self-Efficacy Scale is correlated to emotion, optimism, work satisfaction. Negative coefficients were found for depression, stress, health complaints, burnout, and anxiety. It has been found that a strong sense of personal efficacy is related to better health, higher achievement and better social integration

Applies to KS3

The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is the most widely used psychological instrument for measuring the perception of stress. It is a measure of the degree to which situations in one’s life are appraised as stressful. Items were designed to tap how unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overloaded respondents find their lives. High levels of stress are associated with poor self-reported health, elevated blood pressure, depression, and susceptibility to infection.

Applies to KS3

The PSS-C is helpful for the early identification of children at risk of anxiety/stress. This is important because stress appears to result in increased vulnerability for poorer school outcomes and reduced home functional performance, as well as resulting in problems with overall health, mental health and body weight. An effective and efficient assessment for early identification of anxiety/stress in children assists in the development of appropriate interventions.

Applies to KS3

Being that body image results from a coming together of different factors, the Adolescent Body Image Satisfaction Scale for males (ABISS) helps to identify 3 subscales that attend to how adolescent males perceive their body image.

The first subscale, body competence, helps explain how people may place value in the development of their body from a positive perspective. Closely related to body competence, body inadequacy emerged as the second subscale. For example, feeling ignored, intimidated, and unattractive by other people demonstrates how an adolescent may develop a negative body image.

Other factors, such as feeling insecure and weak, also relate to feeling inadequate relative to a social standard of comparison. Internal conflict was a third subscale that emerged and includes 4 items that capture the balance between an adolescent’s positive and negative perceptions of body image. For example , being critical of one’s body, and seeking reassurance from others concerning appearance

Applies to KS3

Sport England run an Active Lives Children and Young People Survey (covering years 1-11), which is published annually and gives a comprehensive view of how people are getting active

This survey covers the key themes included in the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey for levels of activity (during the school day and outside school) and types of activity. This survey can then be used in conjunction with other surveys from the (1) Physical Activity and Behaviours category e.g.Attitudes to Physical Activity; Time spent not being active; School travel mode and parental physical activity practices; Sleeping habits; (2) Perceptions of Self category e.g. Physical Self Perception Profile; and (3) Mental wellbeing category, to draw some key associations and linkages between physical activity and wellbeing

Applies to KS3

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. However it is important to understand how many hours a day, including weekends, children spend time being inactive and what are they spending time on being inactive e.g. Using a phone or texting ; Using a games console or other video game device.

Applies to KS3

Based on the Trait Emotional Intelligence Theory, the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire is a significant part of research in emotional intelligence (EI). The questionnaire comprises 30 short statements, two for each of the 15 trait Emotional intelligence (EI) facets, designed to measure global trait EI. Example items include ‘I can control my anger when I want to’, ‘I feel good about myself ’ and ‘I’m good at getting along with my classmates’.

Applies to KS3

Based on the Trait Emotional Intelligence Theory, the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire is a significant part of research in emotional intelligence (EI). This questionnaire measures Emotional Intelligence (mixed and trait), Perceptions of Self, Social and Emotional Competence.

Applies to KS3

The WEMWBS is a positively worded scale for the measurement of mental wellbeing. The scale has been widely used nationally and internationally for monitoring, evaluating projects and programmes and investigating the determinants of mental wellbeing. In some cases the WEMBS is free to download/use but you must first register for copyright purposes. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/med/research/platform/wemwbs

Applies to KS3

Transition is an exciting but challenging time for children, especially in Year 6, when the majority  will be moving schools, meeting new people, and building new friendships.

Most children will be looking forward to these changes and recognise them as part of growing up. However, like any change, transition brings a sense of uncertainty, and this can cause children to feel anxious. If transition is not carefully managed, these feelings can have a negative impact on wellbeing, achievement, and attendance.

This survey explores feelings and perceptions around the transition process for year 6 pupils.

Applies to KS3

This survey has been designed to capture insights into students' perceptions and feelings as they transition into a new school. The data collected will provide valuable feedback to help schools understand pupils' experiences and identify areas where they can offer better support.

Benefits:

  • Gain a comprehensive understanding of students' transition experiences.
  • Identify strengths and areas for improvement in the transition process.
  • Develop targeted support strategies to enhance student wellbeing.
  • Foster a more inclusive and supportive school environment.

Applies to KS3
Questionnaire Name
Description

Social-emotional development is increasingly viewed as a central part of schooling in order to help students develop skills that can assist them in navigating the challenges of life.

Part of this social-emotional development involves students being able to effectively navigate adversity and setback, including that which occurs within the academic domain.

Buoyancy refers to an appraisal of one's capacity to deal with a setback Academic buoyancy relates to all students because of the ever-present low-level challenges of everyday academic life.

Applies to KS4

The results from the "attitude to reading" survey for primary schools can be invaluable in helping you to drive and encourage autonomous, positive reading engagement across your whole school, where reading for pleasure is embedded into everyday school life. This survey helps you to learn about a pupil's attitude towards reading and can help you understand what your pupils are really thinking and feeling.

Created in partnership with the School Library Association and the National Literacy Trust, this survey captures information about reading habits, perceptions and attitudes; ultimately enabling you to create a measure of a pupil's reading engagement and enjoyment levels. Here are some of the many ways the results of this survey can be used:

  • Insight into reading, helping you form the basis of a whole-school reading strategy
  • Information to help guide "book stock" choices for your school
  • Identify and help pupils that are in need of extra support but maybe don't want to say
  • Results to help you measure the impact and progress of reading interventions

Applies to KS4

The relationship between physical activity, obesity, and overall wellbeing is well-established. However, assessing physical activity goes beyond simply meeting guidelines. Physical activity encompasses a variety of behaviors in different settings with diverse purposes and intentions.

To gain a comprehensive understanding, it's important to explore attitudes and motives towards sport and physical activity. These factors play a crucial role in a child's resilience and overall wellbeing.

This survey delves into key attitudes and motives related to participation in sport and physical activity. By understanding these aspects, we can better support and promote active lifestyles among students.

Applies to KS4

In recent years, researchers have estimated that concerns about body appearance do not only affect females but males as well. The latest research has estimated that the number of boys engaging in weight loss strategies range from 21.5 to 50%: one-third of adolescent boys prefers a thinner body size, and another one-third prefers a larger and more muscular body (Choane & Pope, 2001; Furnhman & Calnan, 1998; McCabe & Ricciardelli, 2001, 2003, 2004).

Moreover, McCabe and Ricciardelli (2005a) indicated that already at the age of eight, boys focus on increasing the size of their muscles and are already receiving messages to achieve this goal. Gender differences are clear: boys focus on the muscular apparatus, while girls focus on weight loss and body image and appearance.

The Body Esteem Scale focuses on 3 areas - (1) Appearance: the general feeling about appearance; (2) Weight: weight satisfaction; (3) Attribution: the evaluation attributed to others about one’s own body and appearance

Applies to KS4

30-items to assess an individual’s tendency to engage in social comparison in domains related to the body, eating, and exercise.

Applies to KS4

The Child Relationship Survey has been developed by the #2 world-leading researcher in the impacts of bullying behaviour, Professor Dieter Wolke. Bullying is a prevalent issue in educational settings on a global scale, with current data identifying that 1 in 3 children report incidences of bullying (World Health Organisation).

This survey not only explores the child’s relationships with their peers but also goes a step further to develop an understanding of the impact of sibling relationships on a child's developmental behaviours. More recently the survey has incorporated the pressing issue of cyberbullying and the negative impact upon victims, highlighting the accessibility that young people have to this media.

The survey drills down to identify the types of bullying that occur within a setting and the number of instances, allowing the formulation of action plans and specific interventions, again adopting a positive proactive approach to dealing with bullying.

Applies to KS4

It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on the time and types of social media usage, but their attitudes and behaviour whilst online.

Applies to KS4

The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder. The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges.

Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process. According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder

Applies to KS4

Taking the key themes of the health module of the Millenium Cohort Study, known as 'Child of the New Century', this survey looks at eating and drinking behaviours of young children.

The Millennium Cohort Study has provided important evidence to show how circumstances in the early stages of life can influence later health and development.

Applies to KS4

KINDL is a psychometrically acceptable method of measuring quality of life in children. The KINDL consists of six dimensions; Physical wellbeing, emotional wellbeing, self-esteem, family, friends and everyday functioning. This questionnaire was developed with the aim of producing a set of flexible questions which could be answered by children of varying age groups; with this particular version targeting young people in adolescence.

Applies to KS4

Kidscape and Bounce Together have designed 3 short surveys based on the theme of kindness, to help you measure experiences of kindness within the school community. This survey is for pupils/learners.

Applies to KS4

Research indicates that children as young as 7-8 years old are able reporters of their own mental health. In community setting (particularly schools), self-report measurement supports screening for problems and early intervention. The measure consists of 16 items; 10 of which comprise the emotional difficulties subscale and 6 the behavioural difficulties subscale.

Applies to KS4

The Multidimensional Test Anxiety Scale (MTAS) was developed as instrument for measuring test, or examination anxiety (henceforth referred to as test anxiety), in populations of secondary school students aged 11 to 19 years. The 16 items correspond to two cognitive subscales and two affective-physiological subscales.

The MTAS consists of 16 items that ask how students generally feel before, during, or after, tests or examinations. These items are intended to measure relatively stable individual differences in the tendency for students to appraise tests and examinations as a threat and become anxious. A highly test anxious student will show a greater tendency to appraise tests and test-like situations (those situations where one’s performance will be assessed in some way) as threatening and respond with greater anxiety.

The two cognitive subscales are Worry over Failure and Perceived Cognitive Interference (i.e. one’s perception of how anxiety interferes with the cognitive processes required in tests such as memory and concentration). The two affective-physiological subscales are Feelings of Tension and Perceived Physiological Indicators of Anxiety.

Applies to KS4

This survey is a global self-report measure of life satisfaction. It measures a pupil's life satisfaction in five key domains (family, friends, school, self and living environment), with the aim of promoting positive psychological wellbeing. The design enables this survey to be used across a range of ages and ability levels; not only providing an illustration of satisfaction within five specific areas, but also giving a clear overview of more general life satisfaction.

Applies to KS4

The Ofsted pupil questionnaire is great way to get the views and opinions of your pupils about all aspects of school life. This questionnaire is useful way of obtaining an overall picture of how things are going in school as well as highlighting any areas that may have been missed. Note that Ofsted usually supply an online version of the questionnaire for completion during an inspection. However, many schools like to run this survey to gather the views of their staff and pupils, even outside of an inspection window.

This survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Applies to KS4

This exclusive survey has been produced in partnership with online safety specialists Online Safety UK to help schools understand and monitor the online experiences of pupils. The survey measures pupils’ online behaviours and provides teachers with a picture of whether pupils are equipped with the skills they need to navigate their online activities safely. Here are some examples of the things you might do with the results:

  • Pupil-led assembly. Pupils present survey findings in a school assembly, promoting open dialogue and understanding among students, parents, and teachers about online experiences and safety
  • Curriculum enhancement. Use survey insights to enrich the curriculum with targeted lessons on online safety, fostering a proactive approach to responsible online behaviour practices
  • Parent-teacher meetings. Share survey results with teachers to create customised support plans for students, organise workshops for parents based on the findings
Applies to KS4

A key focus in school and relationship education, should be on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with particular reference to friendships, family relationships, and relationships with other children and with adults.

This survey captures a child's feedback on their relationship with their parent/step-parents/carer they have the closest relationship with through a series of scenario's.

For example, Selected parent/step-parents/carer...gives lots of care and attention to me; ...is easy to talk to; ...makes me feel better after I discuss my worries with him/her

Applies to KS4

Self-efficacy is an individuals' confidence in their ability to successfully perform a particular task. Self-efficacy beliefs therefore play a role in maintenance of health behaviours over time. This survey aims to assess self-efficacy beliefs related to physical activity engagement.

The survey includes important questions such as:

  • "I think I can be physically active no matter how busy my day is."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if my friends want me to do something else."
  • "I think I can ask my parent/guardian to get me the equipment I need to be physically active."
  • "I think I can be physically active after school even if I could watch TV or play video games instead."

By exploring these aspects of self-efficacy, we can better understand how to support and empower students in adopting and maintaining active lifestyles despite potential barriers.

Applies to KS4

Physical self-concept is considered to be an important psychological outcome, and factors associated with the self regulation of physical activity such as attitudes and intention Importantly, physical self-concept is viewed as an important contributor to perceptions of self-worth in multidimensional, hierarchical models of self-esteem.

The physical self is defined as an individual’s perception of himself or herself in aspects of physical domains such as strength, endurance, sport ability, and physical appearance.

Applies to KS4

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. Schools also provide a unique context for learning when receptiveness and capacity for attitudinal and behavioural modification is probably at its greatest. It is not surprising, therefore, that various attempts have been made in the past to promote children’s health and fitness through the school curriculum

However it is important to understand an activity profile that includes transport to school and parents who provided either more role modelling or logistic support for Physical Activity may also be more likely to facilitate active travel as part of the overall supportive approach to Physical Activity within the household. This survey focuses on school travel mode and parenting practices and modelling of behaviour

Applies to KS4

Sleep is an important contributor to physical and mental health. However, chronic sleep deprivation has become common in adolescents, especially on weekdays. Indeed there has been a decline of 0.75 min/night/year in sleep duration over the last 100 years, with the greatest rate of decline in sleep occurring for adolescents and on school days.

Furthermore, insufficient sleep as a possible cause of weight gain and obesity has received considerable attention in the media and scientific literature over the past decade - as lack of sleep impacts on eating and activity behaviours. This survey covers some key questions compiled by Loughborough University, who have engaged in a body of research looking at the interconnections between sleep, sedentary behaviour, physical activity and diet

Applies to KS4

Social physique anxiety is social psychological variable derived from theories of self presentation and impression management that reflects an individual’s perceived worry or concern with the presentation of the physique in situations in which others are perceived to be evaluating them (Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989; Leary & Kowalski, 1990). Social physique anxiety is important because it has been shown to be related to salient psychological and behavioural factors associated with health.

For example, social physique anxiety is associated with physical self-esteem (Kowalski, Crocker, & Kowalski, 2001), body image (Chad & Spink, 1996), dissatisfaction with appearance and weight (Crawford & Eklund, 1994), eating attitudes (Haase & Prapavessis, 1998) and motivation to avoid of health-related behaviours, such as physical activity. Overall, females are at higher risk to develop social physique anxiety disorders

Applies to KS4

Social physique anxiety is social psychological variable derived from theories of self presentation and impression management that reflects an individual’s perceived worry or concern with the presentation of the physique in situations in which others are perceived to be evaluating them (Hart, Leary, & Rejeski, 1989; Leary & Kowalski, 1990). Social physique anxiety is important because it has been shown to be related to salient psychological and behavioural factors associated with health.

For example, social physique anxiety is associated with physical self-esteem (Kowalski, Crocker, & Kowalski, 2001), body image (Chad & Spink, 1996), dissatisfaction with appearance and weight (Crawford & Eklund, 1994), eating attitudes (Haase & Prapavessis, 1998) and motivation to avoid of health-related behaviours, such as physical activity. Overall, females are at higher risk to develop social physique anxiety disorders

Applies to KS4

The Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3) is one of the most commonly used self-report measures of endorsement of Western appearance ideals. This 30-item self-report measure provided four subscales: Information (nine items; e.g., “TV programs are an important source of information about fashion and being attractive”), Pressures (seven items; e.g., “I’ve felt pressure from TV or magazines to lose weight”), Internalization—General (nine items; e.g., “I compare my body to the bodies of TV and movie stars”), and Internalization—Athlete (five items; e.g., “I try to look like sports athletes”). The SATAQ-3 has been used in many populations including adolescents, college students, and community samples.

Applies to KS4

The scale consists of six subscales aimed at assessing specific types of anxiety: Social Phobia (SP), Panic disorder (PD), agoraphobia (AP), Generalised Anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), Separation anxiety disorder (SAD), and specific phobias (PFI[fear of physical injury]).

Subscales are scored separately to produce scores pertinent to the specific sub-construct, and also added together for an overall anxiety symptoms score. Since its creation, the scale has become a standard questionnaire and its psychometrics have been tested thoroughly in a multitude of studies across several countries.

Applies to KS4

Self-esteem is an individual's subjective evaluation of their own worth. Self-esteem encompasses beliefs about oneself (for example, "I am unloved", "I am worthy") as well as emotional states, such as triumph, despair, pride, and shame. Many researchers use the term state self esteem to refer to the emotions we are feeling at a point in time, and trait self-esteem to refer to the way people generally feel about themselves.

The State Self Esteem Scale (SSES) a 20-item scale that measures a participant’s self-esteem at a given point in time, and can therefore be measured on a regular basis, recognising the notion that self-esteem is open to momentary changes.

Applies to KS4

The Stirling Children's Wellbeing Scale is a questionnaire designed to measure emotional and psychological wellbeing in children aged 8 to 15 years and is ideal for measuring wellbeing in a primary and secondary school. The survey consists of 15 positively worded questions that aim to provide a holistic view of children's wellbeing.

The questions cover a range of topics, including positive emotions, relationships with others, and sense of purpose. The results of the survey can provide valuable insights into the emotional and psychological wellbeing of students, and can inform the development of interventions or programs to promote student wellbeing.

Unique to the BounceTogether platform, schools can compare their own results to a large sample giving them more perspective compared to what you will find anywhere else. It's a highly regarded survey, that's trusted by hundreds of school on the BounceTogether platform.

Applies to KS4

Research has shown how various types of student subjective well-being are related to positive educational outcomes. Student subjective well-being has been shown to correlate positively with achievement (particularly in primary school students) and feeling accepted and fitting in at school (particularly in secondary school students).

The SSWQ is a 16-item measure for assessing subjective wellbeing of pupils in the school environment. It includes 4 key areas of school life and wellbeing looking deeper into school connectedness and belonging, academic efficacy, joy of learning and educational purpose. School connectedness is linked to levels of anxiety and Emotionally Based School Avoidance (EBSA)

  • School connectedness is defined as feeling cared for by and relating well to others at school;
  • Academic efficacy is defined as appraising one’s academic behaviours as effectively meeting environmental demands;
  • Joy of learning is defined as experiencing positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in academic tasks;
  • Educational purpose is defined as appraising school and academic tasks as important and meaningful.

Subscale scores can be used as standalone wellbeing indicators or summed to create a Overall Student Wellbeing composite scale.

Applies to KS4

Adaptability is defined as appropriate cognitive, behavioural, and/or affective adjustment in the face of uncertainty and novelty. Adaptability has a role in predicting academic (motivation, engagement, disengagement) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, emotional instability) outcomes.

Furthermore, adaptability significantly predicts academic (class participation, school enjoyment, and positive academic intentions—positively; self-handicapping and disengagement—negatively) and non-academic (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and sense of meaning and purpose—positively) outcomes beyond the effects of socio-demographic factors and prior achievement.

The Adaptability Scale comprises nine items, each item reflecting the following criteria: (a) appropriate cognitive, behavioural, or affective adjustment in response to (b) uncertainty and/or novelty that has (c) a purpose or outcome

Applies to KS4

Emotion dysregulation often emerges early in development and is a core feature of many psychological conditions. The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) is a well validated and widely used self-report measure for assessing emotion regulation problems among adolescents and adults. The DERS has six subscales with five to eight items each (36 total).

A substantial body of research has shown significant positive associations between scores on the DERS (specifically the total score) and symptoms of a range of psychological disorders, including borderline personality disorder (Gratz et al., 2006), generalized anxiety disorder (Mennin et al., 2002), substance use disorders (Fox et al., 2007; Gratz and Tull, 2010), social anxiety (Rusch et al., 2012), health anxiety (Bardeen and Fergus, 2014), post-traumatic stress disorder (Ehring and Quack, 2010), and bipolar disorder (Becerra et al., 2013; Van Rheenen et al., 2015).

The DERS short form (DERS-SF) instrument maintains the excellent psychometric properties and retains the total and subscale scores of the original measure with half the items.

Applies to KS4

The General Self-Efficacy Scale is correlated to emotion, optimism, work satisfaction. Negative coefficients were found for depression, stress, health complaints, burnout, and anxiety. It has been found that a strong sense of personal efficacy is related to better health, higher achievement and better social integration

Applies to KS4

The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is the most widely used psychological instrument for measuring the perception of stress. It is a measure of the degree to which situations in one’s life are appraised as stressful. Items were designed to tap how unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overloaded respondents find their lives. High levels of stress are associated with poor self-reported health, elevated blood pressure, depression, and susceptibility to infection.

Applies to KS4

Being that body image results from a coming together of different factors, the Adolescent Body Image Satisfaction Scale for males (ABISS) helps to identify 3 subscales that attend to how adolescent males perceive their body image.

The first subscale, body competence, helps explain how people may place value in the development of their body from a positive perspective. Closely related to body competence, body inadequacy emerged as the second subscale. For example, feeling ignored, intimidated, and unattractive by other people demonstrates how an adolescent may develop a negative body image.

Other factors, such as feeling insecure and weak, also relate to feeling inadequate relative to a social standard of comparison. Internal conflict was a third subscale that emerged and includes 4 items that capture the balance between an adolescent’s positive and negative perceptions of body image. For example , being critical of one’s body, and seeking reassurance from others concerning appearance

Applies to KS4

Sport England run an Active Lives Children and Young People Survey (covering years 1-11), which is published annually and gives a comprehensive view of how people are getting active

This survey covers the key themes included in the Active Lives Children and Young People Survey for levels of activity (during the school day and outside school) and types of activity. This survey can then be used in conjunction with other surveys from the (1) Physical Activity and Behaviours category e.g.Attitudes to Physical Activity; Time spent not being active; School travel mode and parental physical activity practices; Sleeping habits; (2) Perceptions of Self category e.g. Physical Self Perception Profile; and (3) Mental wellbeing category, to draw some key associations and linkages between physical activity and wellbeing

Applies to KS4

In the UK schools influence 40–45% of youngsters waking time, a portion that is only secondary to the time spent in the home. However it is important to understand how many hours a day, including weekends, children spend time being inactive and what are they spending time on being inactive e.g. Using a phone or texting ; Using a games console or other video game device.

Applies to KS4

Based on the Trait Emotional Intelligence Theory, the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire is a significant part of research in emotional intelligence (EI). The questionnaire comprises 30 short statements, two for each of the 15 trait Emotional intelligence (EI) facets, designed to measure global trait EI. Example items include ‘I can control my anger when I want to’, ‘I feel good about myself ’ and ‘I’m good at getting along with my classmates’.

Applies to KS4

The WEMWBS is a positively worded scale for the measurement of mental wellbeing. The scale has been widely used nationally and internationally for monitoring, evaluating projects and programmes and investigating the determinants of mental wellbeing. In some cases the WEMBS is free to download/use but you must first register for copyright purposes. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/med/research/platform/wemwbs

Applies to KS4
Questionnaire Name
Description

The HSE Work-related stress scale was developed and tested alongside the Work-related Quality of Life scale (WRQoL scale - also included in the Bounce platform) by Portsmouth University. The survey is recognised by the Department For Education's Staff Wellbeing Charter, a declaration of support for, and set of commitments to, the wellbeing and mental health of everyone working in education.

The survey consists of 35 items that ask about 'working conditions' known to be potential causes of work related stress. It provides feedback on the seven stressor categories included in the UK Health and Safety Executive's Management Standards:

  • Demands - Includes issues like workload, work patterns, and the work environment.
  • Control - How much say the person has in the way they do their work.
  • Support - Includes the encouragement, sponsorship and resources provided by the organisation, line management and colleagues.
  • Relationships - Includes promoting positive working to avoid conflict and dealing with unacceptable behaviour.
  • Role - Whether people understand their role within the organisation and whether the organisation ensures that the person does not have conflicting roles.
  • Change - How organisational change (large or small) is managed and communicated in the organisation.

The Management Standards Approach recommends that the HSE Management Standards Indicator should be used to gather annual feedback. The analysis of results can help school leaders to understand the current situation in their setting. This is a great starting point for working with employees to improve health, well-being and performance.

Staff Survey

Kidscape and Bounce Together have designed 3 short surveys based on the theme of kindness, to help you measure experiences of kindness within the school community. This survey is for staff.

Staff Survey

Schools are given an Ofsted Staff and Pupil questionnaire for completion during an inspection. This set of questions is designed for completion by all staff in school.

Whether you are expecting an inspection or not, this survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Staff Survey

This is a survey designed to find out a bit more about the reading culture in your school.

Staff Survey

The Teacher Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (TSWQ) is designed to assess the subjective wellbeing of teachers within the school environment. In contrast to many studies that predominantly focus on negative indicators like stress and burnout, the TSWQ aims to address the positive aspects of teachers’ functioning at work. This includes exploring positive affect and prosocial relationships, acknowledging the crucial role these factors play in fostering teachers’ success and maintaining their overall health and wellbeing. The survey offers a holistic perspective on teacher subjective wellbeing, contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of the factors that influence their work satisfaction and positive functioning.

Staff Survey

Emotion dysregulation often emerges early in development and is a core feature of many psychological conditions. The Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) is a well validated and widely used self-report measure for assessing emotion regulation problems among adolescents and adults. The DERS has six subscales with five to eight items each (36 total).

A substantial body of research has shown significant positive associations between scores on the DERS (specifically the total score) and symptoms of a range of psychological disorders, including borderline personality disorder (Gratz et al., 2006), generalized anxiety disorder (Mennin et al., 2002), substance use disorders (Fox et al., 2007; Gratz and Tull, 2010), social anxiety (Rusch et al., 2012), health anxiety (Bardeen and Fergus, 2014), post-traumatic stress disorder (Ehring and Quack, 2010), and bipolar disorder (Becerra et al., 2013; Van Rheenen et al., 2015).

The DERS short form (DERS-SF) instrument maintains the excellent psychometric properties and retains the total and subscale scores of the original measure with half the items.

Staff Survey

The General Self-Efficacy Scale is correlated to emotion, optimism, work satisfaction. Negative coefficients were found for depression, stress, health complaints, burnout, and anxiety. It has been found that a strong sense of personal efficacy is related to better health, higher achievement and better social integration

Staff Survey

The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) is the most widely used psychological instrument for measuring the perception of stress. It is a measure of the degree to which situations in one’s life are appraised as stressful. Items were designed to tap how unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overloaded respondents find their lives. High levels of stress are associated with poor self-reported health, elevated blood pressure, depression, and susceptibility to infection.

Staff Survey

The WEMWBS is a positively worded scale for the measurement of mental wellbeing. The scale has been widely used nationally and internationally for monitoring, evaluating projects and programmes and investigating the determinants of mental wellbeing. In some cases the WEMBS is free to download/use but you must first register for copyright purposes. https://warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/med/research/platform/wemwbs

Staff Survey

The Work Related Quality of Life scale enables organisations to measure the key factors contributing to the well-being, engagement and stress of their staff. More specifically, this scale assesses seven core factors which interact to explain and predict an individual's Quality of Working Life (listed below). This questionnaire has been completed by thousands of educational professionals across the world and is a great place to start in understanding your staff needs as a school.

Staff Survey

The What Works Centre for Wellbeing has developed this suggested set of questions in collaboration with The Department for Work and Pensions to give a quick snapshot of how people are doing with respect to different aspects of wellbeing. So that you can support the wellbeing of your workforce, we recommend that you regularly ask your staff how they are doing using these questions.

Staff Survey
Questionnaire Name
Description

Kidscape and BounceTogether have designed 3 short surveys based on the theme of kindness, to help you measure experiences of kindness within the school community. This survey is for parents/carers.

Applies to Parents / Carers

Schools can use this survey to encourage parents and carers to share their experiences of their child's school. These are the same questions used as part of the Ofsted Parent View.

Whether you are expecting an inspection or not, this survey can offer your school a fantastic insight into wellbeing across key categories in school, helping you:

  • Prepare for an inspection
  • Take control during an inspection
  • Quickly highlight school-based priorities
  • Collect valuable feedback
  • Showcase great results
Applies to Parents / Carers

This questionnaire has been designed in partnership with Governors for Schools to help you gain more understanding about parental/carer views towards a school's wellbeing and mental health environment, policies and culture.

Applies to Parents / Carers
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