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Eating Attitudes

Questionnaire Name
Description
Key stage
The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder. The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges. Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process. According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder
KS3
KS4
Food behaviours, attitudes, environments and knowledge are relevant for childhood obesity prevention, as are dietary patterns which promote positive energy balance. Loughborough University have developed a questionnaire booklet (using previously used/validated questionnaires) for an intervention study on screen-time and diet. There are 17 questions from this booklet in this survey covering the dietary behaviours of children
KS2
KS3
KS4
Taking the key themes of the health module of the Millenium Cohort Study, known as 'Child of the New Century', this survey looks at eating and drinking behaviours of young children The Millenium Cohort Study has provided important evidence to show how circumstances in the early stages of life can influence later health and development.
KS3
KS4
The Children’s Eating Attitude Test (ChEAT) is a modified version of the Eating Attitudes Test. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) is probably the most widely used standardized measure of symptoms and concerns characteristic of eating disorders. The EAT-26 alone does not however yield a specific diagnosis of an eating disorder. The EAT has been a particularly useful screening tool to assess "eating disorder risk" in schools and colleges. Screening for eating disorders is based on the assumption that early identification can lead to earlier treatment, thereby reducing serious physical and psychological complications. Many studies have used the EAT-26 as an economical first step in a two-stage screening process. According to this methodology, individuals who score 20 or more on the test should be interviewed by a qualified professional to determine if they meet the diagnostic criteria for an eating disorder
KS2
KS3
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