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Bullying and e-safety

Questionnaire Name
Description
Key stage
Past research has shown that systematised approaches to questionnaires on bullying result in fewer missing data points, and less variable overall scores when compared to paper-and-pencil questionnaire administration . Furthermore, a systematised approach will allow children to have secure access to the questionnaires, and can go some way to ensuring children feel that their responses are being treated confidentially. It is important to validly measure bullying experiences AND bullying behaviour. Children who report experiencing bullying, are also more likely to report emotional and behavioural problems, whereas children who reported engaging in bullying behaviour are more likely to report behavioural problems (not emotional problems). This survey looks at the frequency of bullying experiences for primary school students. Please note that you CAN make this survey anonymous when you assign it within the Bounce platform
KS2
Past research has shown that systematised approaches to questionnaires on bullying result in fewer missing data points, and less variable overall scores when compared to paper-and-pencil questionnaire administration . Furthermore, a systematised approach will allow children to have secure access to the questionnaires, and can go some way to ensuring children feel that their responses are being treated confidentially. It is important to validly measure bullying experiences AND bullying behaviour. Children who report experiencing bullying, are also more likely to report emotional and behavioural problems, whereas children who reported engaging in bullying behaviour are more likely to report behavioural problems (not emotional problems). This survey looks at the frequency of bullying experiences for secondary school students. Please note that you CAN make this survey anonymous when you assign it within the Bounce platform
KS3
KS4
The scale uses behavioural descriptions only; at no point is the term bullied or bullying used. Bullying is a global issue; across 38 countries or regions, one in three children report being bullied (World Health Organisation).Being bullied is reported to have adverse effects, including physical or mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, an increased risk of self-harm, and attempt or completion of suicide. The effects on health and employment can last into early adulthood and even midlife. This survey has been used in numerous studies to assess bullying and victimization. In recent years it has been extended with items on cyberbullying and used in studies such as the BASE study. There are 5 items on direct victimization e.g., “been hit/beaten up”; 4 items on relational victimization e.g., “had nasty lies/rumours spread about you"; 4 items asked about cyber-victimization e.g., “had rumours spread about you online”; 4 items asked about sibling bullying e.g., "call you nasty names". This survey allows a school to understand peer vs sibling bullying, a subject area that has not received enough prominence. Furthermore, this survey allows for the classification of an individual in 1 of 4 roles for each of direct bullying (physical), relational bullying, cyber bullying separately or overall bullying (all three types of bullying) i.e (1) ‘pure bully’ (perpetrator of aggressive acts only); (2) ‘pure victim’ (receiver of aggressive acts only); (3) ‘bully/victim’ (both perpetrator and receiver); and (4) ‘neutral’ roles (non-involvement in bullying or victimisation)
KS2
KS3
KS4
Past research has shown that systematised approaches to questionnaires on bullying result in fewer missing data points, and less variable overall scores when compared to paper-and-pencil questionnaire administration . Furthermore, a systematised approach will allow children to have secure access to the questionnaires, and can go some way to ensuring children feel that their responses are being treated confidentially. It is important to validly measure bullying experiences AND bullying behaviour. Children who report experiencing bullying, are also more likely to report emotional and behavioural problems, whereas children who reported engaging in bullying behaviour are more likely to report behavioural problems (not emotional problems). This survey captures responses on both bullying experiences and bullying behaviour. Please note that you CAN make this survey anonymous when you assign it within the Bounce platform
KS2
KS3
KS4
It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on access to devices, social media and websites, but what pupils enjoy doing whilst online and their attitudes and behaviour whilst online
KS2
KS3
It is important young people are given facts and information which will help to raise their awareness of issues around keeping safe whilst they are online and about ensuring that their own behaviour is appropriate and legal. This survey focuses not only on the time and types of social media usage, but their attitudes and behaviour whilst online
KS3
KS4
Short screening questionnaire of bullying
University of Warwick (Department of Psychology)
View full details >
Being bullied by peers is the most frequent form of abuse encountered by children, much higher than abuse by parents or other adult perpetrators. The Short screening questionnaire allows the classification of four roles for both direct (physical) and relational bullying: (1) ‘pure bully’ (perpetrator of aggressive acts only), (2) ‘pure victim’ (receiver of aggressive acts), (3) ‘bully/victim’ (both perpetrator and receiver), and (4) ‘not involved’ roles (non-involvement in bullying or victimisation). Bullying occurs in settings where individuals do not have a say concerning the group they want to be in. This is the situation for children in school classrooms or at home with siblings, and has been compared to being ‘caged’ with others. In an effort to establish a social network or hierarchy, bullies will try to exert their power with all children. Those who have an emotional reaction (eg, cry, run away, are upset) and have nobody or few to stand up for them, are the repeated targets of bullies. Bullies may get others to join in (laugh, tease, hit, spread rumours) as bystanders or even as henchmen (bully/ victims). It has been shown that conditions that foster higher density and greater hierarchies in classrooms increase bullying and the stability of bullying victimisation over time.
KS2
KS3
KS4
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